Development resources for SharePoint 2013 development

Start: Set up the development environment for SharePoint 2013

How to: Set up an on-premises development environment for apps for SharePoint

Apps for SharePoint overview

Data access options for apps in SharePoint 2013

Authorization and authentication for apps in SharePoint 2013

*** SharePoint 2013 training for developers

Demo: Tour a Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 site

SharePoint Server 2013 Demo site

Articles on How to secure an ASP.NET MVC app and security risks for .NET developers

1. Articles from Rick Anderson, Microsoft MVP about security on ASP.NET MVC web application.

How to secure an ASP.NET MVC app

Securing your ASP.NET MVC 4 App and the new AllowAnonymous Attribute

2. Series Article from Troy Hunt, MS MVP about Top 10 Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP) security risks for .Net developers.

OWASP Top 10 for .NET developers

Topic include:

  1.  Injection
  2. Cross-Site Scripting (XSS)
  3. Broken Authentication and Session Management
  4. Insecure Direct Object References
  5. Cross-Site Request Forgery (CSRF)
  6. Security Misconfiguration
  7. Insecure Cryptographic Storage
  8. Failure to Restrict URL Access
  9. Insufficient Transport Layer Protection
  10. Unvalidated Redirects and Forwards

Enjoy! 🙂

 

ASP.NET web application security review: Do’s & Don’ts

This article is a well-written overview for the potential security issues on ASP .NET web applications.

The contents are .NET centric, but it delivers a quite decent technical contents on web vulnerability attacks –  Click-jack Attacks, vulnerable HTTP methods, disabled directory listing, encryption on db connection string, and so on.

Hope this helps. 🙂

 

Gang of Four (GOF) Design Patterns in .NET

source article: http://www.dotnet-tricks.com/Tutorial/designpatterns/NTEH250513-Gang-of-Four-(GOF)-Design-Patterns-in-.Net-.html

  1. Creational Design Patterns

    1. Factory Method : Create instances of derived classes
    2. Abstract Factory : Create instances of several classes belonging to different families
    3. Builder : Separates an object construction from its representation
    4. Prototype : Create a duplicate object or clone of the object
    5. Singleton : Ensures that a class can has only one instance
  2. Structural Design Patterns

    1. Adapter : Match interfaces of different classes
    2. Bridge : Separates an object’s abstraction from its implementation
    3. Composite : A tree structure of simple and composite objects
    4. Decorator : Add responsibilities to objects dynamically
    5. Façade : A single class that represents an entire complex system
    6. Flyweight : Minimize memory usage by sharing as much data as possible with similar objects
    7. Proxy : Provides a surrogate object, which references to other object
  3. Behavioral Design Patterns

    1. Chain of Responsibility
    2. Command
    3. Interpreter
    4. Iterator
    5. Mediator
    6. Memento
    7. Observer
    8. State
    9. Strategy
    10. Visitor
    11. Template Method

Singleton Design Pattern – C#

source article: http://www.dotnet-tricks.com/Tutorial/designpatterns/L2KL080613-Singleton-Design-Pattern—C#.html

 

  1. //eager initialization of singleton
  2. public class Singleton
  3. {
  4.   private static Singleton instance =  new Singleton();
  5.   private Singleton() { }
  6.   public static Singleton GetInstance
  7.   {
  8.      get { return instance; }
  9.    }
  10.  }
  11. }
  12. //lazy initialization of singleton
  13. public class Singleton
  14. {
  15.   private static Singleton instance = null;
  16.   private Singleton() { }
  17.   public static Singleton GetInstance
  18.   {
  19.      get
  20.      {
  21.          if (instance == null)
  22.              instance = new Singleton();
  23.          return instance;
  24.        }
  25.    }
  26. }
  27.  
  28. //Thread-safe (Double-checked Locking) initialization of singleton
  29. public class Singleton
  30. {
  31.    private static Singleton instance = null;
  32.    private Singleton() { }
  33.    private static object lockThis = new object();
  34.    public static Singleton GetInstance
  35.   {
  36.     get
  37.     {
  38.         lock (lockThis)
  39.         {
  40.             if (instance == null)
  41.                 instance = new Singleton();
  42.             return instance;
  43.         }
  44.     }
  45.   }
  46. }

Windows Azure Storage Best Practices

Alexandre Brisebois ☁

experts-kid-einsteinToday I was watching the "Windows Azure Storage: What’s Coming, Best Practices, and Internals" session from Build 2013. These are the best practices that were presented.

    As I previously mentioned in “Why Are WebRequests Throttled? I Want More Throughput!” the Windows Azure Storage team recommends that we disable Nagle for small messages that are less than 14 kilobytes. They also recommend that we augment the default connection limit. By default the limit is set to 2, which isn’t much for applications on the cloud. Another recommendation made by the team was to disable the expect 100 Continue response for requests you expect to succeed.

  • ServicePointManager.UseNagleAlgorithm = false;
  • ServicePointManager.Expect100Continue = false;
  • ServicePointManager.DefaultConnectionLimit = 100 (Or more)

The use of the .Net 4.5 framework is greatly encouraged. A lot of work has gone into the Garbage Collector in order to drastically improve it. Using the latest…

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