Mobile OS loyalty: how iOS, Android and others stack up

Gigaom

When a customer switched phones in June, if they had an Android(s GOOG) or an iOS(s AAPL) device, they mostly stayed committed to that OS. But, according to Consumer Intelligence Research Partners’ latest research, iOS users in general were just a bit more likely to stick with the iPhone than and Android users were to pick another Android smartphone.

Here’s CIRP’s chart calculating the loyalty rates of smartphone users by the mobile OS they choose. It shows 78 percent of iOS users chose another iPhone, while 67 percent of Android users stayed with Google’s OS. There is some switching among those though: 14 percent of former iOS users went Android, while 27 percent of former Android users crossed over to the Apple mobile ecosystem.

You can also see how iOS and Android are continuing to decimate the previous era’s smartphone champ, Blackberry(S BBRY): 34 percent of former Blackberry users switched…

View original post 213 more words

Android, iOS pull even in smartphone ad traffic, but iOS still drives most ad revenue

Gigaom

For the second quarter of 2013, there was no outright winner of the most mobile ad impressions on smartphones: Android(s GOOG) smartphones and iPhones(s AAPL) were locked in a virtual tie, according to Opera Mediaworks’ report published Tuesday. But when it comes to impressions generated by all types of mobile devices and revenue from mobile ads, there is a clear winner: iOS.

As you can see in the chart below, Android phones and iPhones each accounted for about 30 percent of mobile ad impressions. But the iPad puts Apple over the top when it comes to overall mobile ad traffic, with 8 percent of that traffic versus Android tablets’ less than 1 percent. (The iPod touch also pulled in about 4.83 percent of mobile ads, which itself was higher than all of BlackBerry’s(s BBRY) mobile ad hits.) That puts the iOS share of mobile ads 13 percent higher than Android.
Opera iOS Android Q2 2013 mobile ads

Apple…

View original post 166 more words

Wish you could get Google Maps for iOS offline? Now you can

Gigaom

Google’s(s GOOG) new native iPad Maps app arrived earlier this week. But there’s a very useful new feature that hasn’t gotten much coverage: the ability to download maps to use offline. This is new to Google’s iOS(s AAPL) app, but has been a feature of its Android maps app already.

The Digital Inspiration blog has a really handy demonstration video showing how simple it is to download small areas of a Google map that you need to use when you’re not on an internet connection.

You search for the area you want, zoom in to the detail level that you need, type a command (“ok maps”) into the search bar and tap search on the virtual keyboard. The map will download to your device for later use. It works for iPad and for iPhone.

Handy, right? I definitely plan to use this instead next time I travel abroad or am…

View original post 15 more words

Which one would you choose – iPhone 5 or Samsung Galaxy S3 ?

Here are some technical reviews/articles on iPhone 5 vs. Samsung Galaxy S3.

Apple iPhone 5 Vs Samsung Galaxy S3 Vs Samsung Galaxy Note 2: Why Apple Did Not Find Many Takers In 2012?

iPhone 5 vs. Galaxy S3: Who wins the battle between the two hottest phones on the market?

Samsung Galaxy S3 vs iPhone 5: Let’s Look At It This Way

Galaxy S3 beats iPhone 5 for best device of 2012

In my opinion, the biggest difference is “excluesiveness” for iOS and “free-open-access” for Android platforms. From the developer’s point of views, this brings a huge difference on to the table regarding more possible “creativeness”.

“Which one would you choose?” That’s the question. =)